What Would You Do?

The Newseum in Washington D.C. is definitely a must-see attraction.  I went last Saturday for the first time, and I was impressed by all the Newseum had to offer. As a future PR practitioner, the ethics exhibit stole my interest the most.

The glass that surrounded the exhibit attracted me immediately. I soon discovered that the designers created it like that for a reason.

“Ethics is a fragile concept, and glass conveys that idea.”Christopher Miceli, senior associate of Ralph Appelbaum Associates, the designer of this exhibit.

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Glass ethics exhibit at the Newseum. Source: Society for Experiential Graphic Design

This exhibit forced me to make difficult decisions for ethical dilemmas that have happened in the past. I learned what choices journalists, experts and the general public made. Examples ranged from, “Would you act crazy just to see what conditions in a mental hospital are like?” to “Would you own a bar to see if people were accepting bribes?” Some people crossed the ethical line in their decision-making and faced repercussions.

For My Future

Putting myself in the situation of a journalist was eye opening. In my future career as a PR practitioner, it is so important that I make the right choice in these types of situations in order to avoid any damage or harm. It is part of my duty to respect privacy, to tell the truth and to be fair. While that may seem like simple things to follow, it is challenging when actually placed in the position.

My Failed Attempt at Reporting

While the ethics exhibit proved most helpful for my career, the NBC News Interactive Newsroom provided the most fun. It gave me the opportunity to play the role of a reporter. Trust me, it is not easy to follow a teleprompter. I probably should have chosen the kids option instead of the adult one.

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My two and friends and I role playing as reporters at the Newseum

Sources:

Newseum.org

Reising, J. (2008, November 22). The Newseum. Retrieved September 22, 2016, from https://segd.org/newseum-0